Introverted Chicago

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My new article for Boing Boing. 

It’s not an exaggeration to say that Potter has impacted almost every major friendship in my life. My sister and I would waste weekends trying out Butterbeer recipes (all of which were terrible), my high school drama class bonded over Potter Puppet Pals, and my best friend and I spent hours listing spells, long after we were too old to do so. But it’s perhaps in college that the series impacted my relationships most. In an unfamiliar environment, “Harry Potter” became a sort of code word to test out new friendships. Some shrugged halfheartedly when the series was mentioned, but others perked up—eager to discuss Patronuses and plotholes (just what were the spectators watching in the second and third Triwizard Tournament tasks?). To those people I felt an instant connection. Despite coming from different places in the country, we were united by Harry Potter. We could recount almost identical stories of staying up through the night to finish books and crying over heart-wrenching moments. [Read more] 

My new article for Boing Boing.

It’s not an exaggeration to say that Potter has impacted almost every major friendship in my life. My sister and I would waste weekends trying out Butterbeer recipes (all of which were terrible), my high school drama class bonded over Potter Puppet Pals, and my best friend and I spent hours listing spells, long after we were too old to do so. But it’s perhaps in college that the series impacted my relationships most. In an unfamiliar environment, “Harry Potter” became a sort of code word to test out new friendships. Some shrugged halfheartedly when the series was mentioned, but others perked up—eager to discuss Patronuses and plotholes (just what were the spectators watching in the second and third Triwizard Tournament tasks?). To those people I felt an instant connection. Despite coming from different places in the country, we were united by Harry Potter. We could recount almost identical stories of staying up through the night to finish books and crying over heart-wrenching moments. [Read more] 

Filed under Harry Potter Potterheads J.K. Rowling We are book eight Potter Generation

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This weekend my roommate and I threw an Art Party.  We bought a bunch of paper, broke out our markers and crayons, and asked our friends to bring booze and/or a supply to share. We weren’t quite sure how the night would turn out, but the result was equal parts relaxing, cathartic, and fun.

We covered our tables with white butcher paper and taped a bunch of paper to the floor. We also hung poster board on the wall, put out coloring books, and collected old magazines for collaging. People quickly spread across our apartment doodling, making pipe cleaner crowns, and getting crafty with construction paper. A friend even brought small canvases and paint, which ended up being the highlight of the night. It was a low key, low pressure way to be creative and show off skills we didn’t even know we had.

You can see everyone’s completed projects here!

Filed under Art Party Party Idea Drawing creativity

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2 Plays
Caroline Siede & Alasdair Wilkins
Debating Doctor Who, Episode 10: "A Good Man Goes To War" and "Let's Kill Hitler"

debatingdoctorwho:

This Week: Alasdair and Caroline welcome a special guest: Kate Kulzick of The A.V. Club and Sound on Sight! With her help we tackle a huge topic: Women, Feminism, and Doctor Who. In part one we talk about the strengths and weaknesses of each companion, look at the troubling tropes of Who mothers, explain just what’s so aggravating about Clara, and discuss whether or not the Doctor should be played by a woman.

In the second half, we take a more in-depth look at Amy and River in "A Good Man Goes To War" and "Let’s Kill Hitler." Does Steven Moffat have a problem writing women?

Let us know which episode won our debate by sending an email to debatingdoctorwho@gmail.com!

Next Week: We take a look at how NuWho has reintroduced monsters from the classic series. Alasdair examines the Ice Warriors in "Cold War" and Caroline revisits the Cybermen in "Rise of the Cybermen"/"The Age of Steel."

Stuff we reference in this episode:

Where to find us:

Trouble with the audio player? Download the podcast directly at this link. And subscribe to our podcast at this feed!

Filed under Doctor Who Debating Doctor Who Feminism

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2 Plays
Caroline Siede & Alasdair Wilkins
Debating Doctor Who, Episode 9: "The Empty Child"/"The Doctor Dances" and "Human Nature"/"The Family Of Blood"

debatingdoctorwho:

This Week: We present a very special World War-themed discussion as we take a look at two of Doctor Who's very best two-parters. Alasdair celebrates “The Empty Child”/”The Doctor Dances” and Caroline praises “Human Nature”/”The Family Of Blood.” In part one we look at the aspects that make these stories so iconic.
In the second half, we look at how these stories function as metaphors for the wars they are set in. What do these stories capture about the ethos of WWI and WWII? What historical parallels can be drawn?
Let us know what you think of our debate by sending an email to debatingdoctorwho@gmail.com!
Next Week: We are excited to welcome our A.V. Club colleague Kate Kulzick for a conversation about feminism and Doctor Who. We take a look at the good (and bad) of all the companions and then raise some of our larger feminist critiques of Steven Moffat’s work as we examine “A Good Man Goes To War” and “Let’s Kill Hitler.”
Stuff we reference in this episode:

Trouble with the audio player? Download the podcast directly at this link. And subscribe to our podcast at this feed!

I am so, so proud of this history-focused episode! Let me know what you think!

Filed under Doctor Who Debating Doctor Who History WWI WWII